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Books, Poems, Thoughts

Catherine the Great’s Maxims for Managers


Catherine the Great, Empress of Russia from 1762 until her death in 1796, was a great believer in ‘maxims’ – short, pithy instructions aimed at improving both herself and her subjects.  She was also, at least until her last years,  a very good manager of people.  So what could she teach today’s managers and HR professionals?  Here is a series of ‘maxims for managers’, adapted from Catherine’s own writings:

  • Whenever you want to introduce a new rule or law, stimulate discussion beforehand and find out exactly what people are saying.  Springing something unexpected on people may not bring about the results you desire.
  • If in doubt, it’s better to do nothing than to do the wrong thing.
  • Flatter your subordinates to ensure that they are not afraid to tell you the truth.
  • Only dispense favours (bonuses, perhaps?) if you are directly asked for them, or if you have already made up your mind to do so without the intervention of a third party, for it is important that the obligation be owed to you and not to anyone else.
  • One of your most important tasks is to select the right people to work for you; unless you know how to seek out the best, and do so, you are not worthy of being in charge.
  • Begin your day with the most difficult, most awkward and most tedious matters; with those out of the way, the rest will seem easy and agreeable.
  • Be prepared to do yourself what you want your subordinates to do (Catherine’s prime example of this was having herself and her son inoculated against smallpox in 1768).  ‘My object was by my own example to save from death countless of my loyal subjects, who, not knowing the benefit of this method, and fearing it, were remaining in danger.’
  • Know how to put people at their ease, while maintaining your own dignity.
  • Give praise in public; if you have to give criticism or blame, do so in private.
  • Have courage, keep on moving forward – ‘words which have seen me through good and bad years alike’.

It is a measure of Catherine’s success as a manager that, though belonging to a dynasty and regime famously characterised as ‘absolutism tempered by assassination‘, she died of natural causes at the end of a 34-year reign.

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Books, Poems, Thoughts

A new (or old?) model for housing

Zoe Williams wrote in The Guardian on Boxing Day about the opportunity presented by the current housing crisis: “The housing crisis is not a threat, it’s an opportunity. We need more social housing, we need a more vigorous construction industry, and we need things for a government to invest in, rather than rounds of quantitative easing, delivering money into the hands of the top 5% and eroding pension annuities. We could climb out of recession on the back of this ‘crisis’ at the same time as halting the hegemony of the private landlord, which is perverting wage spending-power and intensifying inequality.”

I agree with her, but would also suggest that it’s time to think imaginatively about our housing needs and how to fulfil them. Or maybe it’s about revisiting an earlier model and adapting it to the 21st century.

The British obsession with home ownership (see this article by Jon Palmer or this by Andrew Alexander) seems to me to be predicated on the nuclear family, a nice little unit of Mummy,  Daddy and 2.4 children living in a self-contained box, along with a lot of other little units in their own little boxes.  But many of us no longer live in such nuclear families (if we ever did), while more and more households are made up of single people, living alone.  According to Third  Sector Foresight of the National Council for Voluntary Organisations, “By 2021 35% of all the households in the UK are expected to be habited by solo livers, and by 2031, 18% of the entire English population are expected to be living on their own.”  (While ‘solo livers’ may sound like a nouvelle cuisine offal dish, one gets the point.)  In our current model, in which the aspiration is for each household to own its individual house or flat, what an extravagant use of dwindling resources those statistics imply.  For each “solo liver” must have his or her own washing machine, cooker, microwave, dishwasher, TV and a host of other appliances and systems.  Plus each individual has to do their own ironing and cleaning etc., or maybe employ separate individuals for a few hours each to do such things.  Wouldn’t it make more sense if some of these resources could be shared?

I would like to be able to envisage the development of some form of multi-occupancy housing, more than a hostel or hall or residence but less than a block of separate flats, partly shared ownership, partly rented, with relatively small individual living spaces – bedroom, study/sitting room, bathroom, small kitchen area – and with communal space for laundry, more ambitious cooking (and washing up), maybe even for TV-watching and other activities.  And, given that more of us are also becoming freelance or self-employed, there could be shared office facilities too.  There might even be a restaurant on the premises.  Above all, this sort of housing would need to be genuinely affordable for the single person.

I am reminded of the Isokon building in Hampstead, a block of 34 flats designed in the 1930s as an experiment in communal living, and inhabited by a number of writers and artists who wanted to be able to devote more time to their work than to running a house.  And I think it would be a good idea to investigate this kind of communal living afresh.

 

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Books, Poems, Thoughts

Yes to life

It was my birthday last week and, in one way of looking at it, too many years have gone by, without enough achieved, and it’s all downhill from here. A few books written – but not enough, and not successful enough – and too much time spent in ‘the whole corroding business of administration’, as Peter Abelard calls it in Helen Waddell’s still unsurpassed retelling of the story of Heloise and Abelard. Nothing turns out quite as expected; indeed, expectation may be best avoided altogether.

And yet, and yet – I still believe that all that really matters is fully to appreciate the world and the life I have been given to live in it. Worldly success is ultimately neither here nor there. Enough – but not too much – money would be useful, since financial anxiety is possibly even more corrosive than earning one’s living from administration. And to create is a good thing, particularly if what one creates adds something to the sum of human joy or understanding. But appreciating what is already around us may be even better than, or at least as good as, creating something new. To taste, hear, see – really see – absorb, experience, and love. To say ‘yes’ to life, whatever it brings, to stay as fully as possible in the present moment, and to be grateful – immensely grateful – for all the blessings of this life.