Drunkenness

A precise, and concise, description from Joseph Roth, in The Radetzky March, of how it feels to be drunk: Lieutenant Trotta did not budge.  He could remember that his father had recently arrived, and he understood that it wasn’t this father, but a whole bunch of fathers that were standing in front of him.  ButContinue reading “Drunkenness”

Joseph Roth on dying, and living

A reflection from Joseph Roth’s The Radetzky March on how life – and death – has changed since 1914: In the years before the Great War, at the time the events chronicled in these pages took place, it was not yet a matter of indifference whether a man lived or died. When someone was expungedContinue reading “Joseph Roth on dying, and living”

Joseph Roth in “The Radetzky March” on aristocratic principles

“The morals of the time were, as we know, severe. But exceptions were made, often with alacrity. This was one of a handful of aristocratic principles, according to which ordinary citizens were second-class people, but the occasional middle-class officer was made personal equerry to the Emperor; according to which Jews were barred from claiming highContinue reading “Joseph Roth in “The Radetzky March” on aristocratic principles”